Open 10th - Real Sour

so glad your baking:>

I can help on the sour thing, but you must first know this.....I also can smell the sour, but can not really taste it unless it sits in my mouth a bit. I have to have my wife taste the bread and tell me the level of sour. Seems her tongue can taste it right away, my tongue needs the bread to kinda melt into it.

but lets work on really sour bread:>....this is experiment time, sometimes it works out sometimes it doesnt...

One, I build my starter bowl to about 2-3 or more cups over a weeks time, I dont throw out any starter, I just keep feeding it daily about a 1/2 cup and some water,(its all about consistency , thick pancake and then also sponge like, by the end of the week i want it really thick and growing up the bowl), do this in a bowl on the counter, not in the oven, I taste daily and the starter gets really sour (we are building the acid up). Then I take all the starter (minus maybe 1/2 cup that gets fed for the next weeks bread), to the starter I start adding flour and salt (gotta guess on the salt somewhere about 1 tsp per cup of starter, just guess), basically we are now making our bread dough out of more starter, than starter and flour...when you have your dough ball, let it rise, then knock it down and form your loaves and let them rise and then bake.

Two: on the above method, sometimes I dont get a good second rise and it makes flatter bread, but very sour. I have learned to bastardize this bread with active yeast and get a great rise , also in less time....Take one package of active yeast, or about two teaspoons, put into a small bowl, add 1 tablespoon sugar, add warm water, about 1/8 cup or so, mix and let it sit while you are getting your starter ready to mix in the flour, when the yeast is foaming lots, add it to the starter and then start adding the salt and flour to make your dough ball. Ok this is not staying true to sourdough yeast making, but you will get a different type of bread and quickly....

third: I have read adding 1/2 tsp citric acid (sour salt) to the bread making process increases the sour taste. I make my own mozzarella cheese and this is the salt we use, so I have it and am going to try this next week.....

fourth: If you read online about sourdough making, it is always the long slow processes that develop the sour taste, I have done them, and it makes me crazy taking that long to build my dough and make my bread, so I am always experimenting with quicker/bastard type recipes....

good luck to you all


christopher